Shaggy portulaca

Shaggy portulaca

Shaggy portulaca – Portulaca pilosa

Shaggy portulaca is a prostrate succulent annual.  It grows in sandy, gravelly areas in full sun.  The flowers open fully only in bright sun.  Notice the white fluff at the on the bottom stem – this is how it gets its common name “shaggy” & species name pilosa.

Standing cypress

Standing cypress

Standing cypress – Ipomopsis rubra

This is a striking wildflower that demands your attention.  The seeds are easily raised in a garden setting from fall-sown seeds.  Because they can reach 6 feet tall, they make a good background planting in a garden.  Ruby-throated Hummingbirds help pollinate these beautiful flowers.

Wine-cup

Wine-cup

Wine-cup with Orange Sulphur Butterfly – Callirhoe involucrata

This perennial is low & sprawling.  It makes a great groundcover or mass planting.  It continues flowering most of the summer.  It overwinters as a small rosette of leaves.  They are typically found on sandy or gravelly prairies in full sun.

Mealy sage

Mealy sage

Mealy sage – Salvia farinacea

This fast-growing perennial is widely sold in the native plant industry.  It provides a clump of color with its whorls of violet-blue flowers & its grayish green foliage.  It is seen in the natural landscape growing on calcareous, rocky soils.

Texas bluebells

Texas bluebells

Texas bluebells – Eustoma russellianum

This beautiful, upright annual by itself would be enough to convince people to save prairies.  It prefers moist areas in the open.  The petals are generally purple, but can sometimes be white or pink.  The flowers form a bouquet. But don’t pick them because it inhibits the plant’s normal propagation from seed.

Widow’s tears

Widow’s tears

Widow’s tears – Commelina erecta

This interesting perennial is often considered a weed in traditional lawns.  However, in the native landscaped yard, it makes a fine border.  The flowers open in the morning & close in the evening.  If you squeeze the spathe, a drop of water will emerge…hence its name.