Emerald Ash Borer

Emerald Ash Borer

Emerald Ash Borer: The Ash Nightmare

By Rachel Murray

Many US cities are preparing for an Emerald Ash Borer, Agrilus planipennis (EAB) invasion. The EAB is native to northern Asia, but was discovered in Michigan and Ontario in 2002. The adult EAB has a bright outer metallic green color, with copper colored abdominal. It is roughly half an inch long, and only one eighth of inch wide. The EAB larva is milky white with bell shaped segments. Since it is discovery it has spread to over 25 states and most of eastern Canada. The invasion continues to move west. Already 70 million ash trees have been infected and there is a chance of losing a large percentage ash trees in North America. East Texas has already been affected by the EAB. There is a chance that EABs will travel to the DWF metroplex.

You can easily identify if your tree has been infected or not. When an EAB larva bores in to an ash tree, they create a winding S shape path, called galleries. These galleries become visible when the bark begins to split. If your tree is infected, callous tissue will start to form causing the bark to become weak. Another thing to look out for is D shape holes. After they become an adult, the EAB exits the tree and create the hole. You can recognize if your tree has been infected by checking for the S shaped galleries and D shape holes. A citizen can also observe if the tree has been infected by watching for  epicormic shoots.  Epicormic shoots are small shoots that grow from previously dormant branches. If you can identify these factors on your tree, it is likely it has been infected and needs to be treated.

There is multiple ways for you to prevent the invasion of EAB. Most time if an ash tree gets infected it will die in 2-3 years. At this time it would be helpful for you to remove your tree and replace it with another species.  As a citizen you can also spray/inject pesticides for your ash tree. You will have to do this annually, but most the time is will protect your trees from the EAB. To reduce the spread of EAB larvae, do not bring any firewood or ash wood into the area. Even after a tree is cut down the EAB larva can survive and continue to infect the area. Also when you do store firewood, be sure to always keep it away from existing trees, in case of any other pests.

Being observant of signs and knowing the prevention’s can help us stay protected from the emerald Ash Borer.

Picture credits:

Arbor Day Foundation


Its A Trees Life

Its A Trees Life


by Cheryl Bourne Netto – copyright  © June 2017

Have you ever given thought

To the benefits that are brought

By those majestic living statues that are trees?

We may take them for granted

Not knowing how they were planted,

Decorating outdoor space with such grace.

Summer landscapes would be boring

Without these giants with limbs soaring

Displaying a palette of magnificent hues.

Some stand like honor guards

On either side of great, long yards

Leading to grand estates and stately mansions.

A welcome haven for our feathered friends

Many a bough and branch surely lends

A cosy roosting place at the end of day.

Leafy crowns reach out to the sky

As if to touch clouds passing by

While oxygenating the air for our well-being.

Mahogany, teak, cedar, oak, maple and pine

Are some types of trees that we may find

Are used for crafting beautiful furniture pieces.

For Christmas trees the fir is preferred

And by children even perhaps revered

When sparkling with fairy lights and colored balls.

Graceful palms tower protectively over a tropical scene,

Evergreens persevere through the winter in green

Wispy willows weep until the autumn, it seems.

Paper, firewood, planks and housing material too

Are some other uses trees are put to,

Not least of all providing necessary shelter and shade.

There are so many useful purposes that trees serve

And for that much appreciation they deserve.

They are a natural resource which redounds to our benefit.

Providing food and employment while preventing soil erosion,

Shielding ultra-violet rays and cutting down noise pollution,

Without this vital natural resource what would we do?


Big Tree Tour 2017 Thank You

Big Tree Tour 2017 Thank You

Mother nature cooperated and the predicted storms held off long enough to complete our spring Tree Tour. Over 20 people spent the day visiting some of the most notable trees in the region. Some were historic, some were really big and some were just odd! Local arborist Wes Culwell designed the tour stops and had a wealth of information on each tree visited. The day started with a stop at a giant post oak tree where Sam Houston camped while traveling through North Texas and ended with a live oak in Lake Worth that was saved from destruction when the highway was expanded. This tree is currently being cared for by a group of local patrons! Also thanks to the City of Grand Prairie for providing vans and drivers for transporting the tour participants.

Courtney Blevins, CF, CA

Texas A&M Forest Service

Ft. Worth Regional Forester

Forestry Scholarship

Forestry Scholarship

Every year the Cross Timber’s Urban Forester Council helps student fulfill there forestry career dreams by giving scholarships.  We give out 2 scholarships in total for $1000 each.  Each scholarship recipient is required to complete an application that states need, forestry goals, and how they plan on helping the urban forest in Texas.


The following is a letter from one of our recipients.

May 3, 2017

Mr. Gareth Harrier
Cross Timbers Urban Forestry Council
11376 Kline Dr.
Dallas, TX 75229

Dear Mr. Gareth Harrier,

I am sincerely honored to have been selected as the recipient of the Cross Timbers Urban Forestry Council Scholarship. Thank you for your generosity, which has allowed me to focus on my course load without worrying about financial matters.

As I complete my education at Stephen F. Austin University, I am very thankful for receiving your thoughtful gift. Because of your scholarship, I will achieve my goal of a college degree in urban forestry.

Thank you again for your thoughtful and generous gift.


Laura Glenn

Senior – Urban Forestry




In July 2016, Congressman Don Young introduced HR 5650, entitled “Recovering America’s Wildlife Act of 2016.”  The bill, which is the result of a three-year process by wildlife and industry representatives (the “Blue Ribbon Panel”), says that diverse fish and wildlife populations are vital to our nation’s infrastructure and economy.  It is in the interest of our country “to retain for present and future generations… a wide variety of fish and wildlife, to recover species of fish and wildlife…and to prevent fish and wildlife species from declining to the point of requiring Federal protection.”

The Blue Ribbon Panel represents the outdoor recreation retail and manufacturing sector, the energy and automotive industries, private landowners, educational institutions, conservation organizations, sportsmen’s groups, and state fish and wildlife agencies.  The panel recommend funding solutions and Congressional policy options for delivering sustained conservation funding to help maintain a balance between natural resource diversity and natural resource-based enterprise.

HR 5650 was introduced as a “marker bill” designed to start conversations, begin planning, assemble partners in the Congress and in the nation, and create a placeholder for similar legislation to be introduced in the next session of Congress.   When the new session of Congress reconvenes, Mr. Young will reintroduce this legislation, and a member of the U.S. Senate will do the same.  After the reintroduction, expected in the spring of 2017, the legislature will have about 20-22 months to consider and vote on the bill.

What does the bill say?  There is a current fee that is paid by energy corporations that explore or produce energy (fossil fuels and renewables) on offshore and federally- owned land.  That fund generates about $12 billion annually, which goes into the general treasury.  HR 5650, if passed, would dedicate $1.3 billion from that revenue source towards sustaining our most imperiled species.  The money would be required to be spent on Species of Greatest Conservation Need and mandates that state fish and wildlife agencies are the appropriate stewards of those funds.  These agencies would work with the conservation community in their states to implement the Wildlife Action Plan.  In Texas, that plan is called the Texas Conservation Action Plan (TCAP), and was developed by Texas Parks and Wildlife.

But what can it be used for?  These funds can only be used to implement the Texas Conservation Action Plan, which provides a roadmap to recover more than 1,300 imperiled species in Texas.  It includes both imperiled species and sensitive habitats, and lists the major threats to each of these.  These funds, if passed, could also be used for education, outreach, technical guidance, land management, land acquisition, conservation easements, research, and wildlife-based recreation, as long as these activities benefit Species of Greatest Conservation Need.

Organizations that would like to bring this message to their members can request newsletter articles and in-person presentations from the True to Texas Wildlife Coalition.  Contact Karly Robinson at K.Robinson@teamingtxwildlife.com.

from an article by Richard  Heilbrun, Certified Wildlife Biologist, TPWD, San Antonio, TX

For more information:

2017 Urban Forestry Conference

2017 Urban Forestry Conference


The Crosstimbers Urban Forestry Council and Trinity Blacklands Urban Forestry Council would like to thank The Summit and the City of Grand Prairie for hosting our 2017 Urban Forestry Conference.

This was a great conference with almost 200 in attendance, 14 sponsors and 6 speakers.

For Conference Details Click here

Thank you to all of our speakers

Elden LeBrun with Bartlett Tree Care, Guy LeBlanc with Arbor Vitae Tree Care, Dave Appel with Texas A&M Agrilife Extension, Darrell Downey with Engineered Watering Solutions, Matt Klippstein with Husqvarna and John Giedraitis with ISAT.

We would also like to thank all of our sponsors, who make this conference possible.




Arbor Vitae

Tree Care

Guy LeBlanc