Virginia Creeper

Virginia Creeper

Virginia creeper – Parthenocissus quinquefolia

Virginia creeper grows up into trees & makes an interesting focal point along the trunk of a tree.  In the fall, they turn brilliant fall colors & put out bluish fruit.  This beautiful native vine is a good substitution for Boston Ivy or other non-native, aggressive vines in landscapes.

Rattanvine

Rattanvine

Rattanvine – Berchemia scandens

This vine can climb high & it twines, giving it its name “rattan.”  It can even become a twining vine-shrub.  It is found in thickets or woods, near stream bottoms & slopes.  The leaves are reminiscent of Carolina buckthorn leaves, which is in the same family. It produces bluish fruit that stands in contrast against the bright green leaves.

Carolina Snailseed

Carolina Snailseed

Carolina snailseed – Cocculus carolinus

You may find this vigorous vine growing in your lawn, & you can definitely find it in pastures & other sunny locations. It will climb a fence & completely cover it.  So if you need to hide an ugly fence, this is the vine for you!  The birds like the fruit of the snailseed too!

Coral Honeysuckle

Coral Honeysuckle

Coral honeysuckle – Lonicera sempervirens

This beautiful drought-tolerant honeysuckle is a favorite of hummingbirds.  It is filled with flowers that stand just above oval fused terminal leaves.  It makes a nice background interest on a fence or in a corner.  The vine is well-mannered & does not take over like some other vines.  It is also sometimes called Evergreen honeysuckle because it doesn’t lose its leaves in the winter.

Pearl Milkvine

Pearl Milkvine

Pearl milkvine – Matelea reticulata

This delicate vine is often overlooked on a hike through the woods; although it can climb up to 12′ into a tree!  The unassuming star-shaped green flowers have reticulate veins & pearly stamen column.  The heart-shaped leaves would create an additional interest in a landscape setting.