Mesquite

Mesquite

Prosopis glandulosa

Honey Mesquite is a common tree in our area.  It tends to invade pastures & grasslands that are unbalanced.  It is a very drought-tolerant tree that makes a nice addition to an urban landscape – especially xeriscapes – but watch out for the thorns!  Don’t plant a mesquite near a water line or septic system because these trees have infamous water-seeking roots – which is what makes them so hardy even in the worst of droughts.

Paloverde

Paloverde

Paloverde – Parkinsonia aculeata

Paloverde is a native of the Lower Rio Grande Valley & Mexico but it has naturalized in north Texas in some areas where it has escaped from cultivation.  It has green bark & twigs, which help it photosynthesize after dropping its leaves during drought conditions.  The yellow flowers add a whisy delicate look.  The Paloverde also has thorns so if you use this small tree in your landscape, make sure it is away from well-traveled areas of your yard.

Texas redbud – Cercis canadensis var. texensis

Texas redbud – Cercis canadensis var. texensis

This pictured Texas Redbud variety is a regional champion tree.  It is more drought tolerant than its relative, the Eastern Redbud.  It grows on limestone soils & has the same beautiful spring blooms.  It is a great small tree to plant as an accent or centerpiece and its size makes it a choice candidate for planting under powerlines.

(Photo by Melanie Migura)