Citizen Foresters Plant Trees at Lake Grapevine

Citizen Foresters Plant Trees at Lake Grapevine

Citizen Foresters Melissa Carr (Denton), Karen Rice (Grapevine), and Bill Sargeant (Fort Worth) at the Meadowmere Tree Planting

On Saturday, November 12, 2017, three Citizen Foresters joined 27 other volunteers to plant 15 trees (sycamore, red oak, pecan, and dogwood) at the entrance area of Meadowmere Park, on Lake Grapevine.  This Grapevine Arbor Day event was hosted by Keep Grapevine Beautiful, a City of Grapevine agency.  High school and college students, along with parents, formed most of the participants. The weather on this cool and misty fall day was perfect for tree planting.

Volunteers use pickaxes to finish digging the last tree hole at Meadowmere Park.

Volunteers compete to finish digging the last tree hole.

The event culminated in the digging of a hole for planting the last tree: a sycamore. It was a friendly competition between girls and guys: the guys swinging a pick axe and girls handling shovels, both sweating it out to complete a two-foot-deep hole in the hard-caked soil (or perhaps it was rock?). By the time it was completed, both sides agreed it could not have been done without the team effort.

North Texas Giving Day 2017

North Texas Giving Day 2017

Cross Timbers Urban Forestry Council is proud to be a part of North Texas Giving Day.

North Texas Giving Day is an online giving event for people in North Texas to come together and raise as much money as possible for local nonprofits in the 16 county region around DFW. In just six years, North Texas Giving Day has pumped more than $156 million into the North Texas community. In 2016, more than 142,000 gifts totaling $37 million benefited 2,518 nonprofits.

From now until September 14, we want to spread news of this amazing event. We encourage everyone to brag about the great programs CTUFC provides our communities. We encourage all our members to donate and share our event information. If able to donate, know that a donation of $25 is able to receive additional funding. Here’s the really exciting part: Every gift made through North Texas Giving Day.org on September 14th helps our chances of winning prizes given throughout the day ranging from $500 to $5,000!

Our logo is a strong young post oak sprouting from an acorn surrounded and nurtured by the Cross Timbers Urban Forestry Council.  It represents the great things that can grow from humble beginnings when given the proper support.  Your contribution goes a long way in supporting that growth.

Our current objectives are: * Continue providing up to date, science based information to tree care professionals at an affordable annual conference * Support volunteer education and outreach through the Citizen Forester program * Fund the Mayfest Tree giveaway and * Develop community tree planting projects through partnership with local organizations * Expand our capabilities by hiring our first employee; a part time Executive Director.
With past donations, CTUFC.org, has got a face lift allowing us to  continue to nurture urban forestry programs and an awareness of our natural resources.  The museum quality eco-history traveling exhibit, “The Cross Timbers a Natural Wonder”, has spread even farther across communities, reaching visitors in schools, libraries and city halls.  The exhibit fosters an appreciation of the natural and cultural history of the Cross Timbers region.
CTUFC will once again be able to cultivate sound urban forestry practices by cohosting one of the least expensive yet highest quality workshops in the State, the North Central Texas Urban Forestry Workshop.  Local municipal foresters will grow stronger by attending workshops paid for by the Council.
College students of urban forestry at Stephen F. Austin State and Texas A&M will receive scholarships to diminish the burden of escalating education costs. All of this will be due to your support.  Your contribution will help us spread the roots of sound urban forestry throughout our 17 county region.  We appreciate your involvement and have hopes that you are able to glean all the benefits of a healthy urban forest for many years to come.  Thanks to your contribution, we can make it happen.

 

Or go to https://northtexasgivingday.org/ and search Cross Timbers Urban Forest Council.
Anacacho Orchid Tree

Anacacho Orchid Tree

Unique Trees of North Texas:  Anacacho Orchid Tree (Bauhinia lunarioides)

The Anacacho Orchid Tree is a unique tree not seen often in the North Texas area. It is a small tree in the Fabaceae family which grows to approximately 15 feet tall. It is reportedly native to only a few canyons in western central Texas and in adjacent northeastern Mexico. It generally grows in a bush form but can be trained into a single-trunk tree. The leaves are bi-lobed almost like a small split Red Bud leaf or a cow hoof shape. The one pictured blooms bright white clusters of flowers in the spring and then forms flattened seed pods much like a Red Bud tree. There is also a Mexican Bauhinia that blooms light pink clusters of flowers.

The Anacacho Orchid Tree can grow in full sun or as an understory specimen. It is very drought tolerant, requires good drainage, and will tolerate different soil types other than the typical limestone soils of where it is native. North of Austin it will freeze during heavy winters but since it grows so rapidly it forms a new tree in less than a growing season.

If you might like to try growing an Anacacho Orchid Tree it is best that it be planted on the south side of your home or where it is shielded from the north and west winter weather.

Crosstimbers Annual Meeting

Crosstimbers Annual Meeting

Loyd Park, Grand Prairie

September 22, 2017

11 AM

 

Make plans to join us for our annual membership meeting.  Everyone is invited to have lunch, review the year that was and vote on a new Executive Committee.   After the business meeting, you can enjoy the hiking trails, rent a kayak or canoe, or make an evening of it by reserving a cabin or campsite.  Loyd Park is located on the western shore of Joe Pool Lake in south Grand Prairie. Admission if free just say you are with Cross Timbers, everyone will meet in Loyd Lodge.  Click on the map for more information about Loyd Park.

Let us know you are coming by registering on Eventbrite

North Texas Giving Day

North Texas Giving Day

Please Support Us!

Cross Timbers Urban Forestry Council

To promote programs in the region to increase interest in urban and community forestry

Our current objectives are: • Continue providing up to date, science based information to tree care professionals at an affordable annual conference • Support volunteer education and outreach through the Citizen Forester program • Fund the Mayfest Tree giveaway and • Develop community tree planting projects through partnership with local organizations • Expand our capabilities by hiring our first employee; a part time Executive Director.
2018 Tree Conference

2018 Tree Conference

Just Announced 

2018 Urban Forestry Conference

February 1, 2018

Arlington Convention Center
1200 Ballpark Way
Arlington, TX. 76011

 The Crosstimbers Urban Forestry Council and Trinity Blacklands Urban Forestry Council are teaming up with North Texas Nursery Growers for the 2018 conference.  This collaboration will allow attendees to continue to have the top notch class that everyone is accustomed to and access to North Texas Nursery Growers trade show.  More information coming soon.

Emerald Ash Borer

Emerald Ash Borer

Emerald Ash Borer: The Ash Nightmare

By Rachel Murray

Many US cities are preparing for an Emerald Ash Borer, Agrilus planipennis (EAB) invasion. The EAB is native to northern Asia, but was discovered in Michigan and Ontario in 2002. The adult EAB has a bright outer metallic green color, with copper colored abdominal. It is roughly half an inch long, and only one eighth of inch wide. The EAB larva is milky white with bell shaped segments. Since it is discovery it has spread to over 25 states and most of eastern Canada. The invasion continues to move west. Already 70 million ash trees have been infected and there is a chance of losing a large percentage ash trees in North America. East Texas has already been affected by the EAB. There is a chance that EABs will travel to the DWF metroplex.

You can easily identify if your tree has been infected or not. When an EAB larva bores in to an ash tree, they create a winding S shape path, called galleries. These galleries become visible when the bark begins to split. If your tree is infected, callous tissue will start to form causing the bark to become weak. Another thing to look out for is D shape holes. After they become an adult, the EAB exits the tree and create the hole. You can recognize if your tree has been infected by checking for the S shaped galleries and D shape holes. A citizen can also observe if the tree has been infected by watching for  epicormic shoots.  Epicormic shoots are small shoots that grow from previously dormant branches. If you can identify these factors on your tree, it is likely it has been infected and needs to be treated.

There is multiple ways for you to prevent the invasion of EAB. Most time if an ash tree gets infected it will die in 2-3 years. At this time it would be helpful for you to remove your tree and replace it with another species.  As a citizen you can also spray/inject pesticides for your ash tree. You will have to do this annually, but most the time is will protect your trees from the EAB. To reduce the spread of EAB larvae, do not bring any firewood or ash wood into the area. Even after a tree is cut down the EAB larva can survive and continue to infect the area. Also when you do store firewood, be sure to always keep it away from existing trees, in case of any other pests.

Being observant of signs and knowing the prevention’s can help us stay protected from the emerald Ash Borer.

Picture credits:

Arbor Day Foundation

Emeraldashborer.info

Its A Trees Life

Its A Trees Life

IT’S  A  TREE’S  LIFE!!

by Cheryl Bourne Netto – copyright  © June 2017

Have you ever given thought

To the benefits that are brought

By those majestic living statues that are trees?

We may take them for granted

Not knowing how they were planted,

Decorating outdoor space with such grace.

Summer landscapes would be boring

Without these giants with limbs soaring

Displaying a palette of magnificent hues.

Some stand like honor guards

On either side of great, long yards

Leading to grand estates and stately mansions.

A welcome haven for our feathered friends

Many a bough and branch surely lends

A cosy roosting place at the end of day.

Leafy crowns reach out to the sky

As if to touch clouds passing by

While oxygenating the air for our well-being.

Mahogany, teak, cedar, oak, maple and pine

Are some types of trees that we may find

Are used for crafting beautiful furniture pieces.

For Christmas trees the fir is preferred

And by children even perhaps revered

When sparkling with fairy lights and colored balls.

Graceful palms tower protectively over a tropical scene,

Evergreens persevere through the winter in green

Wispy willows weep until the autumn, it seems.

Paper, firewood, planks and housing material too

Are some other uses trees are put to,

Not least of all providing necessary shelter and shade.

There are so many useful purposes that trees serve

And for that much appreciation they deserve.

They are a natural resource which redounds to our benefit.

Providing food and employment while preventing soil erosion,

Shielding ultra-violet rays and cutting down noise pollution,

Without this vital natural resource what would we do?

************

Big Tree Tour 2017 Thank You

Big Tree Tour 2017 Thank You

Mother nature cooperated and the predicted storms held off long enough to complete our spring Tree Tour. Over 20 people spent the day visiting some of the most notable trees in the region. Some were historic, some were really big and some were just odd! Local arborist Wes Culwell designed the tour stops and had a wealth of information on each tree visited. The day started with a stop at a giant post oak tree where Sam Houston camped while traveling through North Texas and ended with a live oak in Lake Worth that was saved from destruction when the highway was expanded. This tree is currently being cared for by a group of local patrons! Also thanks to the City of Grand Prairie for providing vans and drivers for transporting the tour participants.

Courtney Blevins, CF, CA

Texas A&M Forest Service

Ft. Worth Regional Forester